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From the desk of Elizabeth P. McIntosh, 97, a retired intelligence operative now living in a Virginia retirement community

On Dec. 7, 1941, when Japanese planes attacked Pearl Harbor, I was working as a reporter for the Hono­lulu Star-Bulletin. After a week of war, I wrote a story directed at Hawaii’s women; I thought it would be useful for them to know what I had seen. It might help prepare them for what lay ahead. But my editors thought the graphic content would be too upsetting for readers and decided not to run my article. It appears here for the first time:

For seven ghastly, confused days, we have been at war. To the women of Hawaii, it has meant a total disruption of home life, a sudden acclimation to blackout nights, terrifying rumors, fear of the unknown as planes drone overhead and lorries shriek through the streets.

The seven days may stretch to seven years, and the women of Hawaii will have to accept a new routine of living. It is time, now, after the initial confusion and terror have subsided, to sum up the events of the past week, to make plans for the future.

It would be well, perhaps, to review the events of the past seven days and not minimize the horror, to better prepare for what may come again.

I have a story to tell, as a reporter, that I think the women of Hawaii should hear. I tell it because I think it may help other women in the struggle, so they will not take the past events lightly. Continue reading…

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"'Pearl Harbor' is a two-hour movie squeezed into three hours, about how on Dec. 7, 1941, the Japanese staged a surprise attack on an American love triangle."

Roger Ebert, in his review of the much-derided Michael Bay film. (“Of all the negative reviews I’ve written, this one may have my favorite first sentence,” Ebert said on his Facebook page today.)

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The front page of the Honolulu Star-Bulletin, 70 years ago today.
More front pages from Pearl Harbor.

The front page of the Honolulu Star-Bulletin, 70 years ago today.

More front pages from Pearl Harbor.

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“As quiet a day as you’ve ever seen. Beautiful sunshine, nothing going on.”
Francis Stueve was 24 and stationed at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941.
Photo by Marvin Joseph (The Washington Post)

“As quiet a day as you’ve ever seen. Beautiful sunshine, nothing going on.”

Francis Stueve was 24 and stationed at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941.

Photo by Marvin Joseph (The Washington Post)

Tags: Pearl Harbor
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"War with Japan. Get to office."

a telegram delivered to an Associated Press editor who was at the Redskins-Eagles football game at Washington’s Griffith Stadium on Dec. 7, 1941.