Photo
A Jan. 1936 news item.
(No mention of how newspapers make huge amounts of money through these screens.)
Via T.J. Ortenzi via Phil Rosenthal

A Jan. 1936 news item.

(No mention of how newspapers make huge amounts of money through these screens.)

Via T.J. Ortenzi via Phil Rosenthal

Text

6 weird things that make you happy

Let’s just skip to No. 6 on Prevention’s list:

If you’re among the 19 million Americans who have canceled their daily paper, it’s time to resubscribe or read the online edition of your local Daily Planet. Perusing a broadsheet instead of gawking at the TV emerged as a key difference between most-and least-happy folks in a University of Maryland study that analyzed how more than 30,000 people spend their free time.

If you’re in the D.C. area, subscribe. Make it your new year’s resolution.

Quote
"A giant cockroach is harassing the Style section. I haven’t seen it. Apparently it is massive. Most of us are shrieking. One brave Web producer is trying to attack it with a wad of paper towels. “If I can get it, I will kill it. I’m not afraid to kill it.”"

— A dispatch from our newsroom, from us.

Link

washingtonpostinnovations:

Swiss Post International aims to find out by launching MyNewspaper in November, a one-year pilot project that will allow Swiss readers to customize their print editions:

Head of press/publishers at Swiss Post International, Carsten Vossmeyer said: “This means that readers can combine…

This is heresy in the customer-is-always-right age, but: A newspaper shouldn’t give readers what they want. It should tell them what they need to know — fairly, broadly, accurately and compellingly.

(Source: washingtonpostinnovations)

Quote
"I don’t read The Washington Post with any regularity. I don’t subscribe to it. I don’t subscribe to any other paper except the New York Observer, which comes on Wednesdays. There’s only so much you can devote in any one day to reading. But you must read. That’s why I feel I must read the newspapers first. Why? Because I really want to know what is going on."

Gay Talese, on what he reads. He reads the newspaper (not us, but still). You should read a newspaper. (You should read us. PDFs | Subscribe)

Link

soupsoup:

Reports of the demise of newspapers may be greatly exaggerated.

According to a new Harvard study, the denizens of the digital age — 18-to-29-year-olds — would prefer to get most of their political news about the next presidential campaign from — believe it or not — major national newspapers.

In the survey from the Harvard University Institute of Politics, 49 percent of respondents in that age group said national newspapers were their preferred source of political news, outranking friends’ Facebook pages (35 percent), official Facebook pages (29 percent), and partisan blogs (22 percent). Mobile alerts scored 19 percent, while friends’ Twitter feeds and official Twitter feeds garnered 17 and 16 percent, respectively.

We’ve said it once; we’ll say it again: Reading a newspaper (in print form) is the only way to fully grasp the important issues of a given day. So if you live in the Washington area, subscribe to us. It’s, like, less than $2 a week. Best deal in the universe.

Video

The San Francisco Chronicle’s pop culture critic returns to his boyhood paper route: “I’m not afraid of the changing times but I can’t remember feeling closer to the readers than when I was delivering the Chronicle to 65 of my neighbors.”